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Roby v. Burt

United States District Court, E.D. Michigan, Southern Division

March 23, 2017

DYTERIUS ROBY, Petitioner,
v.
S.L. BURT, Respondent,

          OPINION AND ORDER DENYING THE MOTION TO DISMISS AND COMPELLING ANSWER ADDRESSING PETITION'S MERITS AND THE RULE 5 MATERIALS

          HONORABLE SEAN F. COX UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGE

         Dyterius Roby, (“Petitioner”), presently confined at the Muskegon Correctional Facility in Muskegon, Michigan, has filed a petition for a writ of habeas corpus pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 2254, in which he challenges his conviction for assault with intent to commit murder, carrying a weapon with unlawful intent, felon in possession of a firearm, and felony-firearm. Respondent filed a motion to dismiss, contending that petitioner failed to comply with the statute of limitations contained in 28 U.S.C. § 2244(d)(1). Petitioner filed a reply to the motion. For the reasons stated below, the motion to dismiss is denied and respondent is ordered to file an answer addressing the merits of the petition within sixty days of the Court's order.

         I. Background

         Petitioner was convicted following a jury trial in the Saginaw County Circuit Court. Petitioner's direct appeals with the Michigan courts ended on April 23, 2012, when the Michigan Supreme Court denied petitioner leave to appeal after the Michigan Court of Appeals affirmed his conviction. People v. Roby, 491 Mich. 909; 810 N.W.2d 907 (2012).

         Petitioner filed a post-conviction motion for relief from judgment with the trial court on May 20, 2013, which the trial court denied. After the Michigan Court of Appeals denied petitioner leave to appeal, collateral review of petitioner's conviction ended in the state courts on May 2, 2016 when the Michigan Supreme Court denied petitioner's post-conviction appeal. People v. Roby, 499 Mich. 913, 878 N.W.2d 287 (2016).

         Petitioner's habeas petition was signed and dated July 15, 2016.

         II. Discussion

         Respondent has filed a motion to dismiss, contending that the current application for writ of habeas corpus is time barred by the one year statute of limitations contained in the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act. (AEDPA). Both parties, however, have referred to matters outside of their pleadings to support or oppose the motion to dismiss. On a motion to dismiss, a federal district court may consider “matters outside the pleading.” However, “the motion shall [then] be treated as one for summary judgment and disposed of as provided in Rule 56, and all parties shall be given reasonable opportunity to present all material made pertinent to such a motion by Rule 56.” Briggs v. Ohio Election Commission, 61 F.3d 487, 493 (6th Cir. 1995)(quoting Fed.R.Civ.P. 12(b)(6)). Because the parties in this case have asked this Court to consider matters outside the pleadings, the Court will view Respondent's motion as one for summary judgment. Pottinger v. Warden, Northpoint Training Center, 716 F.Supp. 1005, 1007 (W.D. Ky. 1989)(citing to Fed.R.Civ.P. 12(b)); See also Mayne v. Hall, 122 F.Supp.2d 86, 88, fn. 2 (D. Mass. 2000)(construing motion to dismiss habeas petition as being time barred under the AEDPA's statute of limitations as being a motion for summary judgment).

         Summary judgment is appropriate “if the pleadings, depositions, answers to interrogatories, and admissions on file, together with the affidavits, if any, show that there is no genuine issue as to any material fact and that the moving party is entitled to judgment as a matter of law.” Sanders v. Freeman, 221 F.3d 846, 851 (6th Cir. 2000). To defeat a motion for summary judgment, the non-moving party must set forth specific facts sufficient to show that a reasonable factfinder could return a verdict in his favor. Sanders, 221 F.3d at 851. The summary judgment rule applies to habeas proceedings. See Redmond v. Jackson, 295 F.Supp.2d 767, 770 (E.D. Mich. 2003).

         Under the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (AEDPA), a one year statute of limitations shall apply to an application for writ of habeas corpus by a person in custody pursuant to a judgment of a state court. See Corbin v. Straub, 156 F.Supp.2d 833, 835 (E.D. Mich. 2001). The one year statute of limitation shall run from the latest of:

(A) the date on which the judgment became final by the conclusion of direct review or the expiration of the time for seeking such review;
(B) the date on which the impediment to filing an application created by State action in violation of the Constitution or laws of the United States is removed, if the applicant was prevented from filing by such State action;
(C) the date on which the constitutional right asserted was initially recognized by the Supreme Court, if the right has been newly recognized by the Supreme Court and made retroactively applicable to cases on collateral review; or
(D) the date on which the factual predicate of the claim or claims presented could have been discovered through the ...

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